European Court of Human Rights
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The European Court of Human Rights is an international court, which was set up in 1959, in Strasbourg, to examine alleged violations and ensure compliance by the States with their undertakings under the European Convention on Human Rights.

WHAT IS THE EUROPEAN COURT OF HUMAN RIGHTS?

The European Court of Human Rights is an international court, which was set up in 1959, in Strasbourg, to examine alleged violations and ensure compliance by the States with their undertakings under the European Convention on Human Rights.

II. WHAT DOES THE EUROPEAN COURT OF HUMAN RIGHTS DO?

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br>The Court applies the European Convention on Human Rights and ensures that States respect the rights and freedoms set out in the Convention, by examining applications, lodged by individuals or by States. 
When the Court concludes that a member State has violated one or more of these rights and freedoms, the Court delivers a judgment.
Judgments finding violations are binding on the States concerned and they are obliged to execute them. The Committee of Ministers of the Council of Europe monitors the execution of judgments, particularly to ensure payment of the amounts awarded by the Court to the applicants in compensation for the damage they have sustained.

III. COMPOSITION OF THE EUROPEAN COURT OF HUMAN RIGHTS

The European Court consists of 47 judges, one for each State Party to the Convention. Although judges are elected in respect of a State, they hear cases as individuals and do not represent that State. They are totally independent and cannot engage in any activity that would be incompatible with their duty of independence and impartiality.

IV. IMPACT OF THE COURT’S CASE-LAW ON DOMESTIC LEGISLATION AND POLICY

In almost fifty years the Court has delivered more than 10,000 judgments. Given their binding character, they have led governments to alter their legislation and administrative practice in a wide range of areas. The Court’s case-law makes the Convention a powerful living instrument for meeting new challenges and consolidating the rule of law and democracy in Europe.